“When we think about what defines a geek, we think about someone who is deeply, thoroughly invested in a hobby or a project, something they are fiercely passionate about.”

— Tim Quirino, co-founder of Geekadelphia and the Philly Geek Awards

Monetaters Britt Miller and Luke Walker present Startup of the Year

Monetaters Britt Miller and Luke Walker present Startup of the Year

On Aug. 17, Philadelphia saw some of the most glamorous geeks in the city come out to The Academy of Natural Sciences for the Philly Geek Awards presented by Geekadelphia. The program honors people in the Greater Philadelphia area for their work and achievements in science, technology, visual art, film, and more. 

As a sponsor of the event, Monetate was invited to present the award for Startup of the Year. This was a meaningful category for us, because five short years ago, Monetate was itself a fledging startup, just like the companies in this category, and as we have grown, we have purposefully tried to maintain the energy, agility, and culture of a tech startup.

Luke Walker, who leads Monetate’s delivery engineering team, and I were thrilled to present the award for Startup of the Year to Autism Expressed, the first and only online learning platform for teaching adolescents with autism to use digital and social media. (One of our own front-end developers, Tristan Hoffman, had a huge impact on Autism Expressed’s early product development, to which he contributed while he was completing his masters program at Carnegie Mellon.)

Monetate was proud to be a part of the Geek Awards and to help recognize the geeks who make Philadelphia such a great place to live and do business.

The Academy of Natural Sciences had several animals roaming around before the awards. We got to meet an owl, a turtle, an alligator, a snake, and more!

The Academy of Natural Sciences had several animals roaming around before the awards. We got to meet an owl, a turtle, an alligator, a snake, and more!

The awards were printed at Philly's own NextFab Studio.

The awards were printed at Philly’s own NextFab Studio.